1. Introduction
1.1 Who needs that
2. Principles
2.1 Non reversible isolation
2.2 Isolation areas
2.3 New system calls
2.4 Limiting super-user: The capabilities system
2.5 Enhancing the capability system
2.6 Playing with the new system calls
2.6.1 Playing with /usr/sbin/chcontext
2.6.2 Playing with /usr/sbin/chcontext as root
2.6.3 Playing with /usr/sbin/chbind
2.6.4 Playing with /usr/sbin/reducecap
2.7 Unification
3. Applications
3.1 Virtual server
3.2 Per user fire-wall
3.3 Secure server/Intrusion detection
3.4 Fail over servers
4. Installation
4.1 The packages
4.2 Setting a virtual server
4.3 Basic configuration of the virtual server
4.4 Entering the virtual server
4.5 Configuring the services
4.6 Starting/Stopping the virtual server
4.7 Starting/Stopping all the virtual servers
4.8 Restarting a virtual server from inside
4.9 Executing tasks at vserver start/stop time
4.10 Issues
4.11 How real is it ?
5. Features
6. Future directions
6.1 User controlled security box
6.2 Kernel enhancements
6.2.1 Per context disk quota
6.2.2 Global limits
6.2.3 Scheduler
6.2.4 Security issues
6.2.4.1 /dev/random
6.2.4.2 /dev/pts
6.2.4.3 Network devices
7. Alternative technologies
7.1 Virtual machines
7.2 Partitioning
7.3 Limitation of those technologies
8. Conclusion
9. Download
10. References
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6.2.4.2 /dev/pts

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/dev/pts is a virtual file-system used to allocate pseudo-tty. It presents all the pseudo-tty in use on the server (including all virtual server). User root is allowed to read and write to any pseudo-tty, potentially causing problems on other vservers.

Starting with the ctx-6 patch, /dev/pts is virtualised. Although the file numbers are allocated from a single pool, a vserver only see the pseudo-tty it owns.

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